The Counting Game

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GracchusBabeuf
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Re: The Counting Game

#1381 Post by GracchusBabeuf » Sun May 08, 2022 2:24 pm

DarthPorg36 wrote:
Sun May 08, 2022 1:34 pm
why would we do that?
Because numbers without any interesting thing related to them are boring.

PRINCE WILLIAM
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Re: The Counting Game

#1382 Post by PRINCE WILLIAM » Sun May 08, 2022 6:46 pm

Yet, when the game started numbers just as numbers were accepted, this is not out of concept and as we try to close the gap between the numbers and the number of posts, we'd better go on.

1339 AD All streets in the city of Florence are paved, the first European city in post-Roman times where this has happened.

1340 AD Battle of Sluys – In the first major battle (and the only naval) of the Hundred Years' War the English fleet, under the command of Edward III of England, battles the French fleet, under that of Admiral Hugues Quiéret and treasurer Nicolas Béhuchet, assisted by Genoese mercenary galleys under Egidio Bocanegra, on the Low Countries coast. The French fleet is virtually destroyed, and both of its commanders are killed.

1341 AD The Breton War of Succession begins, over the control of the Duchy of Brittany with England and France supporting different claimants of the Duchy. The English won.
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Wusti
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Re: The Counting Game

#1383 Post by Wusti » Mon May 09, 2022 12:08 am

1342

St. Mary Magdalene's flood is the worst such event on record for central Europe. Following the passage of a Genoa low, the rivers Rhine, Moselle, Main, Danube, Weser, Werra, Unstrut, Elbe, Vltava and their tributaries inundated large areas. Many towns such as Cologne, Mainz, Frankfurt am Main, Würzburg, Regensburg, Passau and Vienna were seriously damaged. Even the river Eider north of Hamburg flooded the surrounding land. The affected area extended to Carinthia and northern Italy.

1343

Pope Clement VI issues his bull Unigenitus, defining the doctrine of "The Treasury of Merits" or "The Treasury of the Church" as the basis for the issuance of indulgences by the Catholic Church

1344

King Peter IV of Aragon defeats and deposes his cousin, James III of Majorca, thereby absorbing the Balearic Kingdom of Majorca into the Crown of Aragon, while Castille take Algeciras using gunpowder for one of the first time in european history.
Octavious is an hypocritical, supercilious tit.

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Re: The Counting Game

#1384 Post by PRINCE WILLIAM » Mon May 09, 2022 12:49 pm

1345 AD English forces annexe Gascony in the name of Edward the III.

1346 AD The English defeated the French in one of the three biggest battles of the Hundred Years' war, at Crecy. The French had the numbers with them but the English better position and skilled bowmen gave them the victory. At the beginning of the battle, the English archers annihilated French crossbowmen (actually Genoese in the service of the French). The crossbow was a more powerful weapon but the slow rate of reloading made for a major disadvantage. Having dealt with their enemies the archers shored with arrows the French Knights causing heavy casualties.
At the same time, a new pestilence had appeared at the Mongol territories near the Black Sea...

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Re: The Counting Game

#1385 Post by azcat1990 » Mon May 09, 2022 3:53 pm

1347 - The Black Plague arrived in Europe when 12 ships from the Black Sea docked at the Sicilian port of Messina. People gathered on the docks were met with a horrifying surprise: Most sailors aboard the ships were dead, and those still alive were gravely ill and covered in black boils that oozed blood and pus. Sicilian authorities hastily ordered the fleet of “death ships” out of the harbor, but it was too late: Over the next five years, the Black Death would kill more than 20 million people in Europe—almost one-third of the continent’s population.

Even before the “death ships” pulled into port at Messina, many Europeans had heard rumors about a “Great Pestilence” that was carving a deadly path across the trade routes of the Near and Far East. Indeed, in the early 1340s, the disease had struck China, India, Persia, Syria and Egypt.

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Re: The Counting Game

#1386 Post by PRINCE WILLIAM » Mon May 09, 2022 8:11 pm

1348 AD The Countess of Salisbury had her garter slipped from her leg while she was dancing at a court ball at Calais. When the surrounding courtiers sniggered, the king (Edward the III) picked it up and returned it to her, exclaiming, "Honi soit qui mal y pense!" ('Shame on him who thinks ill of it!'), the phrase has become the motto of the Order of the Garter. Or this is what tradition says.

Tolstoy
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Re: The Counting Game

#1387 Post by Tolstoy » Tue May 10, 2022 1:05 am

1350 AD. Philip VI, King of France, had been having a few seriously bad years. He saw his army smashed at Crecy, lost the important city of Calais, and watched helplessly as his kingdom was ravaged by plague - which killed his wife. But then a bright and radiant star appeared in his court - the stunningly beautiful Princess Blanche of Navarre (his first cousin twice removed). The two were quickly married.

His son, the future Jean II, was pretty ticked off about it, as he and Blanche had been betrothed. It also ticked off Blanche's brother, Charles (later "Charles the Bad", the most perfidious and double-dealing character in all of medieval history), creating an enemy of the Valois dynasty who would cause just as much trouble as the English. And it didn't turn out to well for Philip either, in the end - he died of a heart attack in the throes of passion with his young bride shortly after they were married.

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Re: The Counting Game

#1388 Post by Tolstoy » Tue May 10, 2022 1:08 am

Whoops, skipped a number. 1349 AD: the first wave of the Great Plague gradually peters out throughout Europe.

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Re: The Counting Game

#1389 Post by Tolstoy » Tue May 10, 2022 1:25 am

1351 AD. In an event that presaged both professional sports and the Thunderdome of the original Mad Max movie, an attempt is made to resolve the Breton Civil War by a combat between thirty champions on each side, known as the "Combat of the Thirty" (even though there were sixty of them). The Blois faction (backed by France) emerged triumphant, although it didn't end the Breton Civil War as intended (according to later lore) and there was much wussing out, as surrenders were allowed (there were only a handful of actual fatalities).

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Re: The Counting Game

#1390 Post by Jamiet99uk » Tue May 10, 2022 11:36 am

Tolstoy wrote:
Tue May 10, 2022 1:25 am
1351 AD. In an event that presaged both professional sports and the Thunderdome of the original Mad Max movie, an attempt is made to resolve the Breton Civil War by a combat between thirty champions on each side, known as the "Combat of the Thirty" (even though there were sixty of them). The Blois faction (backed by France) emerged triumphant, although it didn't end the Breton Civil War as intended (according to later lore) and there was much wussing out, as surrenders were allowed (there were only a handful of actual fatalities).
According to the account I've read, all the people on the losing side were executed, so don't they count as casualties too?

Tolstoy
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Re: The Counting Game

#1391 Post by Tolstoy » Tue May 10, 2022 11:47 am

Jamiet99uk wrote:
Tue May 10, 2022 11:36 am
Tolstoy wrote:
Tue May 10, 2022 1:25 am
1351 AD. In an event that presaged both professional sports and the Thunderdome of the original Mad Max movie, an attempt is made to resolve the Breton Civil War by a combat between thirty champions on each side, known as the "Combat of the Thirty" (even though there were sixty of them). The Blois faction (backed by France) emerged triumphant, although it didn't end the Breton Civil War as intended (according to later lore) and there was much wussing out, as surrenders were allowed (there were only a handful of actual fatalities).
According to the account I've read, all the people on the losing side were executed, so don't they count as casualties too?
The account you are reading is incorrect. Several knights on the English/Montfort side go on to have long and impressive military careers (Robert Knolles for one).

Ferdack
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Re: The Counting Game

#1392 Post by Ferdack » Wed May 11, 2022 12:29 am

1352 AD: After years of begging and being a Buddhist monk, the penniless Chinese peasant Zhu Yuanzhang joins the Red Turban Rebellion against the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty of China; he will later become the first emperor of the Ming dynasty.

---Wikipedia

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Re: The Counting Game

#1393 Post by Tolstoy » Wed May 11, 2022 4:53 am

1353 AD. Pope Innocent VI attempts to broker a peace in the ongoing conflict between England and France, selecting as his agent Guy of Boulogne, Cardinal of Porto. A truce is agreed in March, seriously disrupting ongoing French efforts led by the Comte de Armagnac to drive English garrisons out of Quercy and Rouergue. Hostilities quickly resume again by July.

Tolstoy
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Re: The Counting Game

#1394 Post by Tolstoy » Wed May 11, 2022 4:59 am

1354. In January, Charles of Spain, constable of France, is murdered on the orders of Charles of Navarre, who is actively corresponding with France's English enemies and (probably) plotting to seize the French throne for himself. By March, however, he reconciles with Jean II (King of France and Charles' father-in-law/cousin/nephew-in-law), infuriating his English allies.

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Re: The Counting Game

#1395 Post by Jamiet99uk » Wed May 11, 2022 1:25 pm

1356 is the fourth novel in The Grail Quest series by Bernard Cornwell
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Re: The Counting Game

#1396 Post by Jamiet99uk » Wed May 11, 2022 1:26 pm

Whoops, missed one out.

The Battle of Nesbit Moor was an engagement fought in August 1355 between forces of the Kingdom of Scotland and the Kingdom of England.

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Re: The Counting Game

#1397 Post by Wusti » Thu May 12, 2022 1:19 am

Jamiet99uk wrote:
Wed May 11, 2022 1:26 pm
Whoops, missed one out.

The Battle of Nesbit Moor was an engagement fought in August 1355 between forces of the Kingdom of Scotland and the Kingdom of England.
Correction, was resoundingly won by the Scots over the English. Down with the Sassenachs!
1
Octavious is an hypocritical, supercilious tit.

Tolstoy
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Re: The Counting Game

#1398 Post by Tolstoy » Thu May 12, 2022 4:15 am

1357 AD. With the French King Jean II captured at the battle of Poitiers the year before - along with a great number of the nobility captured along with him or killed, France was in complete and total disarray, government falling into the hands of the 18-year old Dauphin (the future Charles V). The Estates-General convene and, dominated by the Parisian guild leader Etienne Martel (who had the threat of throwing the Parisian mob into support of Charles the Bad of Navarre's claim to the French throne in his hand), proceed to abolish unpopular taxes, strip away noble privilege, foreshadowing the French Revolution still 400 years away. The movement becomes known as...

1358 The Jacquerie, a popular revolt that flowers in the spring of 1358. Enraged by a proposed surrender to England to gain the freedom of the captured French king and captured noblemen, Etienne Marcel and his men storm the hotel where the Dauphin is staying in Paris, murder the two new Marshals of France, and take the Dauphin prisoner. The Parisian clergry, either from sympathy to their cause or fear, declares the murders justified. The next day, in front of the Parisian mob, the Dauphin begs for his life and declares that he would always be a friend to the Parisians, and he hopes they to him. French peasant militias start roving the countryside and murder hundreds of French noblemen in France and their families - perceived as traitors for the consistent failures of the French army against the English in the last twenty years.

Three days later, Charles the Bad of Navarre - largely rumored to be behind the Jacquerie - enters Paris with his army. He negotiates a generous treaty with Etienne Marcel, granting him lands and cash and soldiers. A month later Charles leaves.

The Jacquerie, having control of Paris, found themselves unable to govern. They were a few hundred years ahead of their time, unable to fund government when the key tax paying/collecting institution at the time - the nobility - was intractibly opposed to them. The Dauphin escapes from his captors in Paris and raised an army in the countryside. He had no money to speak of, but could offer soldiers the prospect of a hand in pillaging the City of Light.

Charles the Bad, seeing an opportunity, switches sides. He offers a parley to the Jacques' chief military leader, Guillaume Cale, on the eve of a battle with royalist forces. Instead of meeting with him, however, Cale is unceremoniously arrested, led off to the rear, and beheaded after his leaderless army is defeated. Several massacres of peasant rabble armies by small but well-equipped, well-trained, and well-motivated bands of knights follows. The Jacquerie is finished.

Charles of Navarre's army marches on Paris. Etienne Marcel, knowing there was no hope of resistance and seeing the choice as being between Charles of Navarre and the teenage Dauphin whom he had humiliated just a couple months earlier, chose Navarre who was proclaimed "Captain of Paris".

Rumors that Charles of Navarre was going to be proclaimed King of France - a title to which he had at least as much right as Edward III of England by genealogy - forced England and the captive French kind into the same camp. The threat to the established social order of peasant mobs declaring someone a king proved so great that Jean II was released from captivity, a bizarre analogue to the Germans centuries later sending Lenin to Russia.

With The King back in town (or at least the country), loyalties to Marcel and the Revolution wavered. The Dauphin's army, now strong enough to take Paris and intimidate Charles of Navarre out of a fight, marched on Paris. Etienne Marcel, seeing the writing on the wall, and probably seeking some way to save himself, tries to surrender the city without a fight but is murdered by elements of the Parisian mob when he tried to open the gates to the Dauphin's army. Marcel's death, however, has the opposite of the intended effect, and the Parisian revolutionary party dissolves overnight. The Jacquerie, the first and largest of the peasant rebellions created in the wake of the social devastation of the bubonic plague and decades of constant warfare, is over.

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Re: The Counting Game

#1399 Post by PRINCE WILLIAM » Thu May 12, 2022 12:50 pm

1359 AD Greek and Latin states of Southern Greece join forces to fight the coming Turks. Their fleet met the Turkish and crushed it.

1360 AD The treaty of Bretigny ends the first part of the Hundred Years' war with terms that are bad for France.

1361 AD Edward the Black Prince gets married. He's already 31 years old (and considered old by the standards of the time to be single but he had war in his mind all these years).

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Re: The Counting Game

#1400 Post by Tolstoy » Fri May 13, 2022 2:36 am

1362 AD. Sir John Chandos, an English knight, appears before the court of Jean II of France and begins the process of converting the lands ceded to Edward III of England under the Treaty of Bretigny to English authority. Meanwhile, massive bands of now unemployed soldiers, both English and French, known as routiers, terrorize the French countryside, looting, raping, pillaging, and occupying fortified positions. Government authorities, without funding or other means with the French government bankrupt and completely disordered, are helpless to stop them.

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