The Counting Game

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PRINCE WILLIAM
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Re: The Counting Game

#1401 Post by PRINCE WILLIAM » Fri May 13, 2022 12:43 pm

1363 AD: Cretans revolt against Venetian rule on August 25. As this day is the day of Saint Titus (one of the patron saints of Crete) the revolt took the name Revolt of St. Titus.

1364 AD: The Jagiellonian University is founded in Kraków.

1365 AD: The University of Vienna is founded.

Jamiet99uk
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Re: The Counting Game

#1402 Post by Jamiet99uk » Fri May 13, 2022 6:24 pm

LGA 1366 is a type of CPU socket that was designed and developed by the famous processor manufacturer Intel. It is also known as Socket B and was released in 2008. LGA 1366 socket inherits Intel’s LGA 775 (Socket T) in the high-end computers and performance desktop segments. Also, it supersedes the Intel’s LGA 771 (Socket J) in the entry-level servers. LGA 1366 was replaced by Intel LGA 2011 (Socket R) in the high-end desktops on Nov. 14, 2011, by Intel LGA 1356 in the low-level servers in 2012, and by LGA 2011-1 in low- and mid-level servers in 2014.

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Re: The Counting Game

#1403 Post by Jamiet99uk » Fri May 13, 2022 6:24 pm

1337x has been blocked on many ISP's around the world.

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Re: The Counting Game

#1404 Post by Jamiet99uk » Fri May 13, 2022 6:25 pm

Sorry, incorrect number.

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Re: The Counting Game

#1405 Post by Jamiet99uk » Fri May 13, 2022 6:25 pm

Article 1367, Code Civil:

La signature nécessaire à la perfection d'un acte juridique identifie son auteur. Elle manifeste son consentement aux obligations qui découlent de cet acte. Quand elle est apposée par un officier public, elle confère l'authenticité à l'acte.

Lorsqu'elle est électronique, elle consiste en l'usage d'un procédé fiable d'identification garantissant son lien avec l'acte auquel elle s'attache. La fiabilité de ce procédé est présumée, jusqu'à preuve contraire, lorsque la signature électronique est créée, l'identité du signataire assurée et l'intégrité de l'acte garantie, dans des conditions fixées par décret en Conseil d'Etat.

Jamiet99uk
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Re: The Counting Game

#1406 Post by Jamiet99uk » Fri May 13, 2022 6:26 pm

United Nations Security Council resolution 1368, adopted unanimously on 12 September 2001, after expressing its determination to combat threats to international peace and security caused by acts of terrorism and recognising the right of individual and collective self-defense, the Council condemned the September 11 attacks in the United States.

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Re: The Counting Game

#1407 Post by Jamiet99uk » Fri May 13, 2022 6:27 pm

1369 Londonderry Place, Los Angeles, CA 90069 is a single family home listed for sale at $37,995,000.

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Re: The Legacy of Flavius

#1408 Post by Jamiet99uk » Fri May 13, 2022 6:27 pm

See how easy it is to pick things that aren't just a year?

Doom427
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Re: The Counting Game

#1409 Post by Doom427 » Fri May 13, 2022 7:51 pm

1370- Toledo talk radio, apparently? Also owned by Iheart radio. they own everything :eyeroll:

PRINCE WILLIAM
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Re: The Counting Game

#1410 Post by PRINCE WILLIAM » Fri May 13, 2022 7:53 pm

It is a preference matter, history is mine.

1370 AD Bastille is founded, 419 years later it will become a symbol.

1371 AD Robert II becomes the first Stuart king of Scotland, after the death of his uncle, David II. Stuarts will be the last royal family of Scotland as an independent realm. But this won't happen for another 232 years.

1372 AD Helena Dragas is born, she will be married Emanuel the II and become the mother of the last two Byzantine emperors. She will die in 1450 avoiding seeing her son killed in battle and the empire falling.

1373 AD England and Portugal sign an alliance which is still active! (and proved valuable during the Napoleonic Wars to both countries)

Tolstoy
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Re: The Counting Game

#1411 Post by Tolstoy » Fri May 13, 2022 8:56 pm

1374 AD. The fortress of Saint-Sauveur, smack dab in the middle of the Cotentin peninsula, is besieged by a French army under Jean de Vienne. Saint-Sauveur had been the primary English base in Normandy since its capture in 1345 (or 46?), from which all of Normandy had been constantly pillaged and plundered for nearly thirty years.

1375 AD. John de Montfort, the English-backed claimant to the Duchy of Brittany, lands in Brittany with an army composed largely of English mercenaries. The Duchy had been largely lost over the preceding years aside from a few remaining English-garrisoned cities and fortresses to his nemesis, the French-backed claimant Charles de Blois. After several months of sieges and skirmishes, Montfort's army manages to trap a much smaller force led by Blois and most of his prominent supporters behind the walls of Quimperle. Blois had no way to escape. Blois asked for ransom terms; Montfort replied that Blois and his followers had only two choices: death, or unconditional surrender. The end of the Charles de Blois and the brutal Breton civil war, which began before either of the claimants had been born, seemed inevitable.

But after over a month of the siege, a herald rode into Montfort's camp with a note bearing the seal of Edward III, notifying him that England and France had signed a two-year truce, at Bruges. His English mercenaries - the bulk of his army - were ordered to return home. Without them, the siege was over and Blois would escape. Montfort raged, but could do nothing. With the escape of Blois his campaign had failed; Montfort returned to exile for two more years. The Breton civil war would go on.

Also, the English garrison of Saint-Sauveur surrenders the fortress to the besieging French in return for a hefty payment after a siege of nine months, but only after being blasted by a primitive cannon for several days.

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Re: The Legacy of Flavius

#1412 Post by Tolstoy » Fri May 13, 2022 8:57 pm

Jamiet99uk wrote:
Fri May 13, 2022 6:27 pm
See how easy it is to pick things that aren't just a year?
Too easy... and boring. :-/

GracchusBabeuf
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Re: The Legacy of Flavius

#1413 Post by GracchusBabeuf » Fri May 13, 2022 9:11 pm

Tolstoy wrote:
Fri May 13, 2022 8:57 pm
Jamiet99uk wrote:
Fri May 13, 2022 6:27 pm
See how easy it is to pick things that aren't just a year?
Too easy... and boring. :-/
As someone with a passion for History and an even greater passion for copy and pasting from Wikipedia I take offense!

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Re: The Counting Game

#1414 Post by Jamiet99uk » Sat May 14, 2022 12:18 am

Executive Order 1376, signed by President Taft in 1911, provided that:

The presidential positions of deputy auditor in the Treasury Department having been abolished by law, effective June 30, 1911, it is hereby ordered that the following officers may be transferred and appointed to appropriate classified positions in the Treasury Department or elsewhere in the public service:

Edward P. Seeds, Deputy Auditor for the War Department.
James B. Belt, Deputy Auditor for the Interior Department.
Byron J. Price, Deputy Auditor for the Navy Department.
George W. Esterly, Deputy Auditor for the State and Other Departments.
Charles H. Keating, Deputy Auditor for the Post Office Department.

C0nd0r
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Re: The Counting Game

#1415 Post by C0nd0r » Sat May 14, 2022 1:26 am

1377 3MP is a commercial radio station, broadcast from Rowville and licensed to Melbourne.
Diplomacy is the art of letting somebody else have your way. -David Frost
Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock. -Will Rogers
Diplomacy is the art of telling people to go to hell in such a way that they ask for directions.

PRINCE WILLIAM
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Re: The Counting Game

#1416 Post by PRINCE WILLIAM » Sat May 14, 2022 5:30 pm

1378 AD A year of the Papacy, one Pope died (Gregory XI), two were elected (!) Pope Urban VI and Antipope Clement VII and one was born (the future Callixtus III).

1379 AD The aforementioned truce is over and English forces recapturemost of Brittany.

1380 AD In the Battle of Kulikovo, Russian forces under Grand Prince Dmitry Donskoy of Moscow resist a large invasion by the Blue Horde, Lithuania and Ryazan, the battlefield was so crowded that the dead were kept standing pressed from the bodies of those fighting around them.

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Re: The Legacy of Flavius

#1417 Post by Jamiet99uk » Sat May 14, 2022 8:29 pm

Tolstoy wrote:
Fri May 13, 2022 8:57 pm
Jamiet99uk wrote:
Fri May 13, 2022 6:27 pm
See how easy it is to pick things that aren't just a year?
Too easy... and boring. :-/
Picking a year every time is boring.

Tolstoy
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Re: The Legacy of Flavius

#1418 Post by Tolstoy » Sun May 15, 2022 1:25 am

Jamiet99uk wrote:
Sat May 14, 2022 8:29 pm
Picking a year every time is boring.
Seriously?

1381 AD. Tax collectors in England, dealing with large-scale tax evasion from peasants who were growing increasingly weary of ruinous taxation to pay for the war in France, stepped up their brutality. Tax-paying peasants looked around and saw that their taxes were in reality simply enriching the nobility, who got paid to fought the war that had no benefit for the peasants, and were justifiably enraged. In February, their rage boiled over into open revolt. Thousands of peasants rose up and started beating tax collectors and other officials to death with clubs. Tax records were burned. Palaces of noblemen were sacked, including the Chancellor, the Archbishop of Cantebury. The chief target of the rage was the boy-king Richard II's uncle, John of Gaunt, richest and most powerful man in the realm. Fear of mass peasant violence was so great that the captains of John of Gaunt's fortresses turned him away when he would appear at the gates demanding to be let in; he wound up hiding in Scotland for a time.

By June, the peasant armies converged on London. The peasants opened all the prisons in the city, and looted the Savoy - John of Gaunt's London palace. The King and the chief ministers were holed up in the Tower of London, defended by the veteran captain Robert Knolles (who survived the Combat of the Thirty decades before) and a handful of men-at-arms. The government appeared to be completely at the whim of the mob; the king watched helplessly from The Tower as various important buildings in London burned to the ground. Desparate, the 14 year old Richard II insisted on meeting with the rioters to negotiate a resolution to the situation. A parley was arranged outside the Tower; the king and his handful of knights, massively outnumbered by the peasants, had no choice but to agree to their demands for a complete restructuring of English society - a wholesale social and economic levelling that would've resulted in an egalitarian system with the King - to whom the peasants were sincerely loyal - at its head. While this parley was taking place, other peasants took the opportunity to storm the Tower and beheaded the Chancellor, the Archbishop of Cantebury, the Treasurer, John of Gaunt's personal physician, and a seargant who was believed to be responsible for hunting down tax evaders before the uprising. Elsewhere throughout London, hundreds - real or perceived beneficiaries of noble and government privilege and taxes - were hunted down and murdered.

The King and government appeared completely powerless. A second parley was arranged. A scuffle broke out, and the uprising's chief leader, Wat Tyler, was grievously wounded by men in the King's party. The peasants were outraged, and widespread violence was imminent, until the boy-king bravely stepped in front of the peasants and declared him their new leader, and commanded them to reconvene in a field 30 minutes away. Meanwhile, Robert Knolles gathered what forces were available to defend the established order, including a large force of armed Londoners from rich households. When the peasants reconvened, they found themselves surrounded and the king nowhere to be found. Leaderless and uncertain, they lost their nerve and disperesed.

The government quickly regained control with violence to match the peasants'. Wat Tyler was ripped out of the hospital he had been carried to and beheaded. When a group of peasants had an audience with the King and asked if the concessions he had made would be honored, the king replied "Wretches! Peasants you are and peasants you will remain!" The Great Peasants' Revolt was over.

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Re: The Counting Game

#1419 Post by Tolstoy » Sun May 15, 2022 2:34 am

1382 AD. The City of Ghent (in modern-day Holland, and where John of Gaunt had been born several decades previous) received a demand from its nominal lord, Louis de Male, count of Flanders. Ghent had been in a state of de facto independence for several years after a revolt against Louis, which Louis had been unable to put down. Now, however, after several years to marshal his resources, he demanded that Ghent surrender to his authority and send him hostages to guarantee the city's obedience. Ghent responded by electing Phillip van Artevelde - son of Jacob van Artevelde, who had led the city in revolt decades earlier - its captain. Phillip wrote to Richard II of England promising to acknowledge him as Count of Flanders and King of France in return for military support, but the English court - divided by a multitude of strategic agendas (most prominently John of Gaunt's never-ending Wile E. Coyote-ish schemes to gain the crown of Castile for himself) - dithered. Louis de Male gathers his army and sends another demand for the immediate surrender of Ghent, requiring that all military-aged males appear in a field with nooses around their necks and subject themselves to his immediate judgement. Van Artevelde replies that he has no authority to to dispose of the lives of his citizens thusly.

Louis de Male's army marches from Bruges and meets the Ghentian army in battle. As battle is joined, large elements of de Male's army - Brugeois guild members with more loyalty to the Ghent rebels than to the feudal order represented by de Male - switch sides. The battle goes badly for the forces of feudalism; de Male is unhorsed and nearly captured, but manages to escape back to Bruges. There, however, he finds that the people of Bruges had also risen against him; his allies in the city are murdered and he again is forced to flee. The cradle he had slept in as a baby is even dug up, publicly smashed, and its remnants send to van Artevelde as a trophy. Seeing the turning tide, other cities throughout Flanders - most notably Ypres - also throw off de Male's yoke, who is driven out of Flanders entirely and finds refuge in one of his castles in Picardy. Flanders is free.... for now. But all know that de Male will someday return.

Van Artevelde and the rebels again request assistance from England. But again, England - still quaking from the Great Revolt of the previous year and tax revenues at an all-time low, is powerless to take advantage of the situation as it had in the 1340s. Van Artevelde then turns to Charles VI of France, offering to submit Flanders to his direct control under the rule of a governor appointed directly by him; this proposal is laughed at by the French court, who recognize the danger to the established order the Flemish peasant rebels represent. Instead, they raised the largest army France had mustered since the disaster at Poitiers nearly thirty years before and marched on Flanders in November of 1382. They begin to march on Ghent, sacking every rebel Flemish town and village in their path with merciless bloodshed. Van Artevelde raised an army of some 40,000 guildsmen and peasants, hoping for a repeat of the great slaughter of French knights at the Battle of the Golden Spurs some eighty years previous. Battle is joined on November 27th, near Roosebeke. The battle-hardened French knights, adopting the tactics of their English enemies that had been learned the hard way over the past fifty years, dismounted and advanced on foot against the Flemish army in a thick fog. The Flemings respond with arrows and grapeshot fired by primitive cannons, meteing out some damage. But the instant the battle-lines meet, it is all over. The army of Flemish townsmen - weavers, bakers, carpenters, stonemasons and the like - proved no match for French knights and men-at-arms, clad in armor, with weapons forged from the best steel and wielded with strong arms that had been training for this exact moment since they were children. Thousands of Flemings are hacked to death as they attempt to flee the battle-turned-massacre; thousands more die with no visible wounds, having been trampled to death by their own comrades-in-arms in the mass panic that began almost as soon as the battle was joined. Over 30,000 Flemings - the majority of the army - lay dead.

The Flemish rebellion, like so many rebellions recently before it, is crushed. Hundreds of town and guild leaders are executed as city after city falls to the French army with no real resistance. Louis de Male is restored as Count of Flanders, one of the richest provinces in Europe that would eventually pass on to his son-in-law, the Duke of Burgundy, creating the nucleus of the short-lived but immensely powerful Burgundian state of the next century.

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Re: The Counting Game

#1420 Post by Jamiet99uk » Sun May 15, 2022 11:00 am

Lego set 1383 was "The Curse of the Pharaoh", launched in 2002 as part of the "Lego Studios" range.

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