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Finished: 08 AM Mon 16 Mar 15 UTC
Private RHS International Affairs Game 2
2 days, 2 hours /phase
Pot: 70 D - Autumn, 1909, Finished
Classic, Draw-Size Scoring
1 excused missed turn
Game won by tedwmoeller (620 D)
30 Jan 15 UTC Spring, 1901: Welcome to Game 2! Remember to private message other people in the game because messaging is a very important part of the game. Teamwork against a country will be important when it comes to defeating another country. Also, If you have any questions about how to submit a move or anything that relates to rules feel free to message me and ask. I will be more than happy to explain it to you. Good luck, and have fun!
30 Jan 15 UTC Spring, 1901: Also, beware because what people say to you might not be honest. "Stabbing" someone in the back is a part of the game.
30 Jan 15 UTC Spring, 1901: You can ask me questions as well. I highly recommend reading the rules (ugh... Rules and Reading...) but they really help. Also, if you aspire to be a World Dominating Tyrant, here are a couple links to better your odds.
For good alliances: http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Diplomacy/Alliances
For game stats and how to best win: http://diplom.org/Zine/F2007R/Burton/statistician3.htm

Additionally, I would like to recommend thinking like a greedy, conniving world leader. Gaining (and abusing) trust between Powers is essentially the definition of Diplomacy, and Diplomacy is the name of the game. There will be a lot of backstabbing, but if you can find a good ally, you will win. Think logically: 2 against one wins, so if you make nice with one of your neighbors, you will easily defeat your other neighbor.

Finally, I would like to say a couple things about what the Web Diplomacy site Moderators will dislike. They have the power to kick us off the sire, and I have narrowly escaped said exile before—no fun/do not recommend. If you set up another account and join games with both accounts, that is called multi-ing. That is a no-no for obvious reasons. They will see that the IP address between two accounts in a game is eerily similar (aka the exact same...) and will email you and if you don't respond you'll kicked out into the cold.
The next way they will get mad at a player is if you have relations with a player in real life and coordinate moves together. Players should not have a bias against a player before they start the game. If there is a bias, then the game is unfairly favorable or unfavorable to certain players, and that makes the game less fun (even though stabbing your buddy is pretty hilarious, don't do it just for giggles. You are only allowed to do it if it is the logical way to better your Country's geographic advantage or diplomacy). This definitely applies to these class games. Don't team up on the guy who stole your girlfriend(s? ouch...) or team up with your tennis teammate because you trust them more than others.

I know I said a lot, so ask questions if you need to. You can ask them here or during class to Mrs. Moeller

Good Luck! And May the odds be (n)evah in your favah
02 Feb 15 UTC Autumn, 1901: A heads up to all players: if you are currently occupying an SC/center, it doesn't become yours until the end of the year. Just be aware of that cause it's kind of a drag when you leave your center like a noob and end up with nothing haha
03 Feb 15 UTC Autumn, 1901: Please finalize moves (Italy haha)
06 Feb 15 UTC Spring, 1903: Please finalize moves (Why'dYaDoItThisTime)
13 Feb 15 UTC Autumn, 1905: If you look to the bottom right of the board, you can see what we call a stab in the back... Austria pulled Russia away from their home centers by enticing them with Turkey's last center. Additionally, Austria told them that they would be friends.
This was a good move by Austria for quite a few reasons. By moving an army into Sevastopol, they can now move into Moscow. By supporting Armenia into Ankara, Austria makes Russia unable to get back to its home centers this turn. Plus, they are stranded from any help in Ankara, so Austria can just take Ankara from them next turn if Russia tries to save their home centers.
If we continue with our narration of the board, we can look to Italy and Austria's relationship. They have obviously struck a deal and created a non-aggression pact. This sounds good for Italy since they can focus on France's southern Supply Centers. However, France looks to have created a wall, so Italy has very little potential gain in the West. Fortunately for Italy however, is that they can't get stabbed by Austria since Austria doesn't have a fleet near them. As long as Italy supports Venice to hold (and Venice holds) they have a wall against a potential Austrian stab. Good job Italy, but you may need a new strategy against one of your neighbors if you want to grow.
If we keep moving panning west, then we will see that France has started to grow very rapidly. They have taken over all of England through very poor game-play by Germany and non-existant game-play from England. England seems to have stopped playing... As for Germany, they have taken a strategy of attacking Russia. Normally, this is a good strategy, but when there is such a large Power on their western front, they can't afford to spend units on an Eastern campaign.
Looking specifically at the Scandinavian area and the spaces touching them, one can see that St. Petersburg is heavily contested. Germany will definitely take it if they want it, but, as previously mentioned, it will come at a cost in their western SCs in Munich and Denmark.
That brings us full circle to Austria and Russia. If Russia is to hold Austria at bay, they will have to make a choice between attacking Germany or saving Moscow and stopping Austria. We shall have to wait and see what they do...
I hope this board summary helps you guys out. If you have questions, then ask here or ask Mrs. Moeller. Also, if you would rather have no game summaries, then just say so!
Best of luck!
16 Feb 15 UTC Autumn, 1905: Hey Everyone--Here is a rules reminder so we don’t get in trouble. If you join another game, make sure it is a “private” game. If you get into a public game with someone you know, it is a violation of the Diplomacy website rules. If you’ve gotten an email about this, then you know what I’m talking about. I’ll explain this more in class tomorrow.
24 Feb 15 UTC Spring, 1907: What is the new game called because I have been searching and searching for International Affairs game 7. What do I do?
24 Feb 15 UTC Spring, 1907: Second Round #1. There are numbers one through four.

Start Backward Open large map Forward End

France
tedwmoeller (620 D)
Won. Bet: 10 D, won: 70 D
20 supply-centers, 16 units
Austria
NancyM333 (291 D)
Survived. Bet: 10 D
14 supply-centers, 14 units
Germany
raul_15 (161 D)
Survived. Bet: 10 D
0 supply-centers, 1 units
Italy
Alec (148 D)
Survived. Bet: 10 D
0 supply-centers, 2 units
England
Defeated. Bet: 10 D
Turkey
Jessica17 (100 D)
Defeated. Bet: 10 D
Russia
Defeated. Bet: 10 D
Civil Disorders
Harriets_world (100 D)Russia (Autumn, 1907) with 0 centres.
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